This paper is about educational research journals in general and the British Educational Research Journal in particular. In this paper, we discuss some of the aims of educational research journals and several the challenges facing them; we also identify various ways in which journals could consider doing things differently. Two issues are of particular significance. The first is about the accessibility of educational research in an era of rapid technological change and the rise of Open Access publication models. The second is to do with the mission of education journals in relation to long-tanding and pervasive educational inequalities.

Cite this article as: Baker, W. and Connolly, M. (2018). Revistas de investigación educativa: una visión parcial desde el Reino Unido | Educational research journals: a partial view from the UK. Revista Española de Pedagogía, 76 (271), 437-448. doi: https://doi.org/10.22550/REP76-3-2018-02

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William Baker is a Lecturer in the School of Social Sciences at Cardiff University. His research is concerned with understanding educational inequality and the consequences this has for people’s life-chances and their identities. He is also conducting research on the origins, development and stratification of values, pro-social preferences and moral worldviews. He was recently the editor of the British Educational Research Journal and is currently on the editorial board of the British Journal of Sociology of Education.

 https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4050-4735

Mark Connolly is a Lecturer in the School of Social Sciences at Cardiff University and an educationalist with experience working in a variety of institutional and cultural contexts. His areas of research include professional identity, children’s rights, risk and outdoor education and education and cultural policy.

  https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4278-1960